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. in the district of columbia like los angeles, there are certain places where one in two young african-american men are in the system that are locked up or on probation and parole. it seems to be to be such a misguided self-destructive set of policies. >> host: even when i prosecuted there were questions that i had to go through. i started directly in misdemeanor and i like okay. why am i prosecuting the guy that sold the deodorant from the cvs? i had those in my mind like the things that were prosecuting misdemeanors back then. why are we in court costs because like the woman in your book the person that does say blowjob on the top. but you also talk about not just the system itself in terms of the actor will court that you spoke about just now and that we kind of lock people up and throw away the key. the sentences or the saying is if we did the crime what then do the time. but there are sometimes you tell about to clients in your book that it isn't giving away everything but it does show that in real life the shawshank redemption is real. >> guest: i tell about people who are still the incarcera
't see them. it's staggering and why is that? isn't the district of columbia like los angeles and the rock's? there are certain places where one into african-american men are in the system and our law up or on probation or parole. it seems to me to be such a misguided self-destructive set of policies. >> host: as you know i'm a prosecutor but when i prosecuted there were questions i had. i was never in juvenile but started with misdemeanor. why am i prosecuting a guy that stole deodorant from the cbs? i even have those questions in my mind at least is a woman of color as some of the things were prosecuted as misdemeanors back then, why are we in court because he went back to the deodorant issue of? like the woman in your book, the person who does the on the cob. you also talk about not just a system itself in terms of the actual -- he spoke briefly about it now and the parole system that we love people up and throw away the key. we don't really -- the sentences if you did the crime let them do the time but there are some times that -- so you tell about two persons, to clients
a lot of analysis in the sub categories, plus six focus groups in richmond, virginia, chicago, and los angeles, and we found that john f. kennedy with the short presidency is the most admired, liked, respected, and popular president of the modern era. historians say, come on. not so much -- 1038 days, but what was interesting to me is that's the judgment of the american people. we entitled that chapter "the people's president," and so i think -- i think readers will be interested to see how kennedy is viewed and why in the assassination is a big piece of it, but so is kennedy's public image, the rhetoric stirring, the self-deprecating humor, and the io tent dis. >> guest: i have the record album of the address, and i can recite is verbatim right now. >> host: right. >> guest: when i listen to it, put it on a couple times a year, i get goose bumps when i hear it. >> host: you mentioned the nine presidents following, although, writing about reagan, there's a phrase that reaganfuls the first president not to be haunted by the guests john kennedy. do you think you agree with that? >> guest
americans said we could do a lot of analysis in the subcategory plus richmond virginia, chicago and los angeles. and we found john f. kennedy with that short presidency is the most admired, liked, respected and popular president of the modern era. a history in who studies the actual record would say, on. 1,038 days. but what was interesting to me is that is the judgment of the american people. we entitled at the people's president and so i think that the readers will be interested to see how can this be viewed and why if the assassination is a big piece of it but was kennedy's image above rhetoric which is still stirring the self-deprecating humor, the glamorous nature. >> host: when i listen to it i still get goosebumps when i hear it. you mentioned the president's followings. although having written about ronald reagan i came across the phrase that said that he was the first residents not to be haunted by the ghost of john kennedy. do you agree with that? >> guest: you know this better than i do he wasn't in the democratic party, the republican party. he didn't have to pretend to be t
is nominated in 1960, joe was in los angeles, where the convention was. he has to stay hidden from view in a rented home they were a living. when kennedy goes to the convention hall to accept the nomination, he brings his mother and she goes out onto the podium with him and she waves to the crowd. jack and his dad only appear the day after the election when all is said and done and all is over. joe comes out and there is the famous portrait of the whole family at hyannisport, all of pro and a close victory of jack. >> host: he threw the screen parties when jack was first running. didn't rose and her daughters inserted these people they feel like they could come meet royalty. was it not part of their appeal? >> guest: it was. they were called tea parties. they started in 1946, the very first one for the congressional campaign. and then they just kept doing these two senate campaigns. when jack defeated henry cabot lodge, which was an upset in 1952, lodge was quoted as saying it was those tea parties that did me in. you are right to say first of all, women love to come to those because th
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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